Uncharted Territory: The Walmart Comic Rack

Posted in Comics with tags , , , , , , , , , , on 11/12/2016 by Kevin Entrekin

* Tuesday’s Gone- Metallica “My baby’s gone with the wind” RIP Sophie, my Baby Girl.

***

I hate going to Wal-Mart. There is a suffocating air as soon as you walk in the place. An air that reeks of artificial attitudes and a tension that feels like a brawl could break out for no reason at any moment. Unfortunately, the store is only a two-minute drive from home, so I have to brave the sanctified aisles of the mega cathedral of consumerism to acquire necessities.

While I hurriedly was trying to find the shortest check out line to purchase my sriracha and boxed quinoa, I saw something familiar, yet out-of-place: Comics. Not individual issues mind you, but packs of three relatively recent issues from Marvel and DC. They were inconspicuously stuffed between Yu-Gi-Oh! and Pokémon cards and had a nice round price of a fiver on them. (Edit: this is a more recent photo of the display, where it is now directly marketed as Marvel/DC packs and the Marvel issues are now $10).

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Maybe this isn’t anything new and I’ve just missed it. But I guess I shouldn’t be surprised, really. It’s a logical business stepping point for the Big Two to start selling books at… well, practically anywhere they can. Like when Piggly Wiggly had a random rack of comics next to a Pog vending machine when I was a kid (90’s kid trigger warning).

These comic packs are water-testers. I wager it won’t be long before people can go to their local mega store for Wednesday pick-ups. Yet another threat the local comic shops will have to weather.

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Let’s dissect the bag I bought: I picked up the more mysterious packaging of the two, the Marvel pack (Which isn’t advertised as a marvel set as you can see from the scan above). It promised the possibilities of “randomly inserted Bronze, Silver, & Modern Age Keys”. A promise I suspected to be hollow and fruitless before ripping the package open.

I was surprised though when I did actually open it up, because I was expecting some stuff from a fifty-cent bin. Instead they were all three relatively recent Marvel issues: Star Wars: Shattered Empire #02, Radioactive Spider-Gwen #01, and Hercules #02. The oldest issues (SW and Gwen) date back to only December 2015 and Hercules is as recent as March 2016.

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  • Radioactive Spider-Gwen #01

I guess this was the “key” (gotta sneak in that insider comic lingo like “keys” to draw in the kiddos) first issue the promotion bubble was talking about.

I love Spider-Gwen. Jason Latour and Robbi Rodriguez’s creation is one of the best things Marvel (had) came out with in a long time. But, this is the second number one Gwennie received in 2015. The first five issues were disrupted by the marketing series Secret Wars, and after a few months Spider-Gwen “continued” with a new name and first issue.

And even though this is a continuation, a lot of the uniqueness and fun of the original initial issues have been lost. Rodriguez’s art hasn’t changed and Latour’s writing isn’t much different. But the fun is gone, and I think I know who is responsible: Marvel.

Marvel is its own worst enemy when it comes to good series like this, Howard the Duck, and Spider-Woman. Secret Wars was forced into Gwen’s world and had to “start over”. Then only a few issues into Radioactive, Gwen was sidetracked once again with the Spider-Women arch (combining forces with Silk and Spider-Woman). That series was quite fun actually, but still off course. Then they saw that the cream was sweet and made a Gwenpool series, thus trying to milk a cow before it can produce..

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  • Hercules #02

Hercules was the mystery issue in the pack. For starters, I had not heard of it. For a series that came out this year, it went unnoticed on the shelves at my local shop and I had not heard any praise for it. But this was issue two, and a second printing at that apparently. Maybe there was some thing more beyond the Liefeld-esque cover.

There wasn’t, sadly. I secretly wanted this to work and I can see what they were going for: The tarnished hero that must seek redemption. But it doesn’t really work when all I keep coming back to is thinking of Thor. That doesn’t usually matter to me, but the plot itself is predictable and the art forgettable, making the hero himself forgettable.

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  • Star Wars: Shattered Empire #02

Shatter Empire was the most interesting issue, and the far superior read in comparison to Hercules (in comparison to issues I hadn’t read, as I already had read Spider-Gwen).

I don’t remember this 4-part series when it first came out among the slew of almost 20+ Star Wars titles Marvel released to promote The Force Awakens. Before reading I did a little research and learned it was about Poe Dameron’s parents essentially, which put me on edge that it was just a flaming fandom rubbish pile.

But the plot is handled by storied writer Greg Rucka, and it’s a strong plot. Although I had not read the first issue, it was easy to catch up and get involved in the story. It mainly focuses on Poe’s mother Shara Bey, who is an ace rebel pilot assigned to escort Princess Leia on a mission to Naboo, where things go awry.

I think what surprised me more than the good story was the art. The art by Marco Checchetto, Emilio Laiso, and Angel Unzueta is solid and beautifully colored. Especially the fight sequence at the beginning of the issue between AT-ATs and rebel squadrons.

While there are some weak/unnecessary plot like Princess Leia writing condolence letters, this isn’t just a random story thrown together to be a promo for The Force Awakens. Assuming the rest of the series is as strong as this issue, I am intrigued enough to pick up a trade and read the whole series.

***

So, let’s break down what you get with this mix bag of comics: You get three comics from Marvel. Considering they are all fairly recent releases, for five dollars (or now it seems ten) you get twelve dollars worth of comics (each book individually cost $3.99). That is a bargain from a technical standpoint. But you have to consider what you’re getting: A mystery pack of issues that aren’t fresh. Yeah, I got a nice surprise with the Shattered Empire issue but still, that issue is for a series that ended a year ago. These are overstock issues comic shops have in discount bins so they can make space.

I see these packs, again, only as market testers. Something chain stores use as a litmus test to see if selling comics is profitable for them. I also see them as underwhelming gifts a family member gets you because “you’re into comics and I saw this while checking out”. Instead, do yourself a favor and venture into a comic shop. Yeah, you’ll have to pay regular price like the rest of the nerds, but at least you get something you want to read. And you’ll also maybe find a whole new community to be apart of.

 

Renaming the Site: Nostromo Coffee

Posted in Nerdism, Uncategorized on 24/04/2016 by Kevin Entrekin

I don’t like the name The Stacks Only Grow. It was meant to reference the fact that the media I’ll write about (film, comics, video games, books, etc) always seems to stack up and grow, never deplete. It represents the maddening feeling of materials just piling up.

But its a boring phrase. An offhanded comment that doesn’t have the weight to be a site name. It’s too long and sterile. And as one of my closest friends so accurately pointed out, “it sounds more like a tagline, ya know?” And she’s right. It doesn’t represent what I want to do here, and more especially the atmosphere I want to make this. That’s why this site will now be Nostromo Coffee.

nostromoellenI fell in love with the USCSS Nostromo the first time I watched Ridley’s Scott’s Alien. Its unique in the way that the ship feels lived in and functioning, unlike a lot of science fiction interiors that feel sterilized and has glowing white lights everywhere. Deckard’s apartment in Blade Runner (another Ridley Scott masterpiece) also has that same type of atmosphere and vibe. That’s what I want this site to feel like I guess. Comfortable and familiar, as much as a digital entity like a website can feel that way.

And coffee… because I love coffee. And the crew drinks quite a bit in the film. Just fits, really.

So nothing really changes on the site other than the name. I’m still having a slow go at getting articles published but working on it. And my thoughts and ideas about what I want from this site are still the same, but always evolving. So all I’ll really say is sit back and enjoy a cup of Nostromo Coffee with some chillwave in the background.

Well, one final thing: Alien day is on 4/26, coincidentally. So far it just seems like a couple of businesses trying to get some money out of people by offering “exclusives” (Like the Aliens soundtrack with green liquid-filled vinyl selling for an outrageous $225 from Mondo). But bollocks to all that. I encourage to instead watch Alien if you have never seen it. Or rewatching it if you have. It’s an important film to me, especially the heroine Ellen Ripley. And I think any fan of Sci-Fi or Horror should see this film at some point.

Southern Bastards #13

Posted in Comics with tags , , , , , , on 20/03/2016 by Kevin Entrekin

(listen: “Take it Easy“, by The Eagles)

Its Caucus time in the Kingdom of Fear at the time of typing this (who knows when this will get published, but it’s getting worse) and Fuhrer Trump and his minions are kicking a Black Lives Matter protester out of their Klan rally on television. They’re throwing punches and trash at the kid, which isn’t unusual for the crowd you see at El Comandante’s rallies. This is Phobos incarnate, broadcast to either the lust or disgust of the masses.

I went to the polls for Super Tuesday, a perfectly dreary and wet day in West Tennessee. No waiting in line as I entered a florescent-lit room in the back of a church with a lone Trump sign out front. I pushed the red button and cast my vote for Bernard Sanders. I thought for the first in my voting history, I’d feel satisfaction after voting. But I didn’t. I knew the state of Tennessee would go Trump and Clinton. My vote didn’t matter.

The pundits and media are already craving for Jefe Naranja and Clinton to gore each other with broken pool cues in the general election. They already have belts around their necks and hands down their pants waiting for each candidate to speak. Bernie is being discredited as a real threat in the aftermath of recent early voting, even with his numbers steadily rising and winning a few important states. He’s not out, but it’s not going to be clear until the ref raises the victors hand. Bernie is going to have to go the full twelve with the last jab thrown. Then its on to the title fight.

Why am I being so candid on politics? I don’t normally talk publicly about my opinions on this glorified soap opera, even though I like to keep my nose in it. People get irrational and violent when talking about politics, same with religion and guns. I avoid those toxic conversations.

Maybe because I actually believe in this candidate. The first politician that I don’t look at like all the other perverted, greedy politicians. Bernie gives the aurora of authenticity and being unsullied. He remains (presumably) uncorrupted or bought by the evil bastards and industries.

People say that about Trump as well, but that’s a lie; he’s malleable like Reagan. Pliable to the will and saccharine words of anyone who gives the front of being “intelligent”. That’s why Republicans love him so much. He’s a puppet for their bidding, and just the right sensual words whispered into his ears results in the carpet bombing of some far-away land or the holocaust of “undesirables”.

But what can you do, really? I guess just sit back with a cold Miller and watch the kids argue. Might as well enjoy it, especially for like-minded individuals who think Trump is a proper bastard. I’ll probably be black-bagged on the way to work one day by his newly instated SS division in a grandiose sting operation and shipped off to a black site in Kentucky run by Charles Graner and Lynndie England.

(Listen: Dead Flowers, by Townes Van Zandt)

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Southern Bastards, #13

Published by: Image Comics. $3.50 Print/$2.99 Digital. Story by Jason Aaron. Art by Jason Latour.

(Read: Jason Latour on The Charleston Terrorist Attack, the rebel flag, and the modern south, featured in issue 10).

As a southerner raised on Alabama football and Memphis BBQ, Southern Bastards is a work of art. It highlights what makes the south home, blemishes and beauty. There’s the humble hospitality of southerners, then the underlying sinister side of the governing individual law enforcement, a biblical eye-for-eye system.

The story is handled by a good ‘ole boy from Bama, Jason Aaron. The language in the pages of each issue he produces is authentic linguistics and mannerisms exhibited in the southland. To some, the characters probably seem exaggerated. And to an extent they are, but there’s a awful lot of truth in them as well. You meet people like this down here, good and nasty.

The south is also a land of underlying beauty with a seething slime of sinisterism just below the surface, which Jason Latour captures beautifully in his art. Both ragged and stunningly gorgeous, he includes little things that make the books an authentic southern experience. Even something as simple as background details and fashion choices of the residents of Craw County makes you fell the thick, humid heat and scent of roasted pig flesh in the air.

I guess I should take a moment here to advised this will be spoiler territory here on out. I don’t like to take something away from the potential reader of a book or viewer of a film, so I’m alerting you now: If you haven’t read this beautiful series or issue 13 yet and plan to, maybe come back at another time.

From the front cover, you know this issue is going to be different from the previous twelve. It has a blue color scheme, whereas the past issues have been red. Things are more tense than usual in Craw County with the rivalry game against Wetumpka finally here.

This is a turning point in the series: Craw County gets walloped in the game, and the biggest crack in the Coach Boss empire is now visible. He is vulnerable, especially when after the loss he finds the biggest player from Wetumpka and beats the crap out of him. And every enemy Coach Boss has ever made has taken notice that he’s weakened. The vultures are circling.

Aaron in previous issues has found a way of making you sympathize with the villain by looking back at what made him the villain in the first place. Does it excuse Coach Boss of his sins because of his past? No, but you do understand why he is who he is. Whereas Earl Tubb’s was the protagonist in a Walking Tall role during a the first arc of this series, Euless Boss has in turn become the protagonist. He’s a crooked man in jackpot, and there’s a hell of a lot of people trying to keep him from getting out of it.

Latour somehow makes Coach Boss look harder in this issue. His features are more cut, his face more skeletal and grisly. Overcast that with the gloomy weather ever-present in this issue, the entire atmosphere of this issue is suffocating. And with the reveal that Earl Tubb’s daughter is finally making her way to Craw County for Southern justice, things are bound to get even more tense.

How much longer can this series go on before it losses its steam? One or two more arcs? Fifteen to Fifty more issues before its sauce is too vinegary? I don’t know. Maybe we will venture outside of Craw County to keep the stories coming. I’m not sure, but I do know that I’ll be patiently waiting until the next issue comes out. Patience, after all, is a southern virtue. Though, it is hardly practiced anymore.

*Bought at Comics & Collectibles.

Visiting the island: Island #6

Posted in Comics with tags , , , , , , , , , on 12/02/2016 by Kevin Entrekin

(listen: “Comfort Eagle” by Cake)

“… anybody with a terminally jangled lifestyle needs at least one psychic anchor every twenty-four hours…” St. Hunter S. Thompson said that. For him it was the solitude of a gluttonous breakfast chased by Bloody Marys and six fat lines of cocaine.

I think about him a lot lately, especially with America in the midst of election season. Wonder what he would think of this kingdom of fear known as the civilized world. Wonder what he would think of corrosive politics being intravenously injected into ever damn facet of normal life. What would he say about an open modern Nazi bastard and an open socialist running for president? A plethora, I imagine. But we’ve deviated off course a bit.

I wouldn’t categorize myself as terminally jangled, I guess. Moderately jangled sounds about right. But, my “psychic anchor” is slightly less extravagant than Hunter. I like to end my day bunked in bed during the early hours reading a few comics from a stack that never seems to diminish, only grow (hence, the name change from The Morning Thunder Buffalo). This time spent slipping between panels is comforting, like a film. Inspires creation, while allowing the chaos of the brain hemispheres to take a cease fire.

This comic is just one of the things I’ve been reading. In the future, I’m planning on talking more about a wide variety of things I’m reading, watching, and listening to. Fresh stuff off the shelf. Dusty gems from the fifty-cent bin. Newly released movies. Forgotten fried gold films.

This will probably also be a slow process and have growing pains. But, I’m excited to see where this goes. Its hard letting go of the buffalo. He helped me through some rough patches in life. But I had to let him go, which has been a personal lesson for over a year now. Letting things go for growth. Letting go of someone I loved. Letting go of the comforts of a dead-end job. Letting go of apathy.

(listen: “Separations” by Diarrhea Planet)

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Island #6

Published by Image Comics. $7.99 print/digital. Stories & art by F Choo (intro art), Onta (Badge of Pride), Gael Bertrand (A land Called Tarot), Katie Skelly, Sarah Horrocks (Essay on Kyoko Okazaki). Curated by Brandon Graham and Emma Ríos.

Comic mags are making a quite comeback. In a few months Grant Morrison is taking over as editor of Heavy Metal, sparking new interest in the beloved schlock rag. And around the same time of that announcement back in summer, Brandon Graham and Image Comics published the first issue of Island.

For context, Graham is one of my favorite artist. When I was first starting to get back into comics, my friend Cody introduced me to his work in Multiple Warheads and it was an instant attraction. The fluid movement of his art and his pun-laddened writing is a lucid-dream experience. It’s like being wrapped in a warm blanket as you’re lightly led through a bizarre, unsafe, fun Soviet carnival.

Island features very little of Graham’s work or writing, outside of his new installments of Multiple Warheads. But, his presence is looming over the project. He gathers artist and writers who are similar to him, outsiders of the norm in terms of the two big publishers. People like Amy Clare are fresh on the scene, with her first work being published in the third issue. People like Farel Dalrymple are legends in comix, and he has contributed two new editions of Pop Gun War in previous mags.

This issue will be the most polarizing for readers, I think, as far as content. Half of the issue is dedicated to furries. Even the cover features the characters from the story, Badge of Pride by Onta. For those outside the know, Furries are a fandom subculture dedicated to fictional tales of anthropomorphic animals with human characteristics, varying in degrees of eroticism usually.

Badge of Pride is about a gay couple, one open and the other closeted, going to a pride parade. Not to be blunt, but that the general gist.

Now, I have a core theology about literature and film: a) All stories must be approached with an open mind, rarely without regard to subject matter. Adam Sandler, for example though, is met with prejudice (among similar toxic things).  b) The story has to be good. With that practice in mind…

I enjoyed Badge of Pride. It accomplished the latter while I kept in mind the former. Though it doesn’t feel like a complete story, so much as something to peak your interest. Further reading is available on Onta’s webpage (nsfw, by the way). There are also themes of acceptance and being proud of who you are in the story.

I think the point of this installment was a better understanding of the furry culture. Which it has done to the extent it needed. Will I, or the public as a whole, fully understand the appeal? Probably not. But things like this help bridge the gap to understanding and common ground. And maybe someone who is shy about furryism will get a great sense of inclusion from this.

The other half of this issue is the second installment of A land called Tarot by Gael Bertrand, a wordless fantasy adventure that I absolutely loved from the first story in issue four. And this second installment is just as great. The art is simply gorgeous, the colors rich and saturated. The characters have an instant charisma and attraction to them.

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The wordless narrative is effective. It leaves a lot of imagination for the reader, which ultimately is the point of a fantasy story. Though, it is a little more loose here and may require a second read, but its such a fun ride to go on.

There’s also an essay by Sarah Horrocks on the use of death and corpses in Kyoko Okazaki’s mangas, which is an engaging read for those familiar with Okazaki’s work. And a few works of fashion art from katie Skelly, which are nice and really left me wanting more.

This issue is a bit smaller in size. It’s the second that has saddle-stitch staple binding (unlike previous issues that were perfect bound), and is approximately thirty-pages shorter than previous issues. Is this an omen of some sort? Hopefully not. But it is worrying that the next issue comes out in May.

Spending $8 on a comic magazine may seem like an extravagance, but you genuinely get your rubles worth from Island. More so than shelling out $4 for a marvel book that’s half-filled with adverts for Agents of Shield.

*Bought at Comics & Collectibles, the best shop in Memphis.

My Favorite Holiday Films (Updated)

Posted in list with tags , , , , , , , on 11/12/2014 by Kevin Entrekin

A few years back I wrote an article listing my five favorite Christmas films, and in review it was a combination of bad writing and lame choises. I included Home Alone and It’s A Wonderful Life in that list. And if I’m honest, as enjoyable as those films are, I will survive each year without viewing either of them. Because I don’t really enjoy most films with a heavy focus on the holidays, more the ones that just happen to take place during the season. So here is my updated, true, five six or seven favorite X-Mas films. And maybe they’ll be aides in your survival of the holidays as well.

  •  Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005)

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If I could choose only one film to consider essential personal viewing during the holidays, I’d choose Shane Black’s genre-blending Kiss Kiss Bang Bang. What more could you want? Murder. Mystery. An inept Robert Downey Jr. Val Kilmer as a gay private eye. And femmes Michelle Monaghan and Shannyn Sossamon round out an even more expansively talented cast in a modern, comical noir. Black’s name has more provenance since last year with his sophomore directing effort, a little indie flick called Iron Man 3. And he wrote another film on this list, but more on that later. But this film, clever and underratedly brilliant, is still one of my favorite films.

  • Die Hard (1988)

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I have only ever seen two Die Hard films. The original McClane classic and then the terrible A Good Day to Die Hard. And I’m fine with that. The original has a plethora of fun and mayhem to satisfy each repeat viewing. You get a primed and smart-ass Bruce Willis facing off against wicked Alan Rickman set in Nakatomi Towers. There is an unmistakable 80’s aesthetic without straying too far into a cliche or becoming formulaic. Think of it like this: A crappy Christmas party you were invited to, but exciting and fun. Well, that’s the plot. You get the comparison though, right?

  • Trading Places (1983)

jlc4Time to buffer that action with some comedy, and what better way to do that than with this classic John Landis 80’s Pauper-adaptation. It has many great actors at the height of their careers. Eddie Murphy is hilarious yet sincere as a poor black man given a job as a stock trader. Dan Aykroyd is equally entertaining as snooty stock trader turned poor white man. And Jamie Lee Curtis, whom (no secret) I very much adore, is charming as a smart prostitute with a heart of gold. Trading Places has that special Landis charm and whit that combined with this cast makes for an heart-warming comedic romp.

  • Lethal Weapon (1987)

lethal-weapon-2I love the Lethal Weapon films. They’re a guilty pleasure that I don’t really feel guilty about. It’s odd to me, that modern action films shy away from such a brilliant formula as these films. Yeah, you get to switch off and just watch, but not like now where people have to wipe away dribble from their lips at the end of a Michael Bay film. Did LW get a little ridiculous? Better believe it. I mean, a guy gets killed by a flying surfboard in the sequel. But there was some intelligence to these films, something to keep you lucid and connected. Before Gibson went nutty and Glover was actually too old for anything, they were one of the best buddy cop duos around. Well, they still are. And that Shane Black guy mentioned earlier? Yeah, he wrote it.

  •  National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation (1989)

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A December nary passes the Entrekin household before watching Clark Griswald’s decent into middle-class holiday hell. To this day, this comedic observation of those quirky people we call family is still relevant. Considering that this film comes from the Lampoon’s, a studio that pumps out about fifteen films a year and the last one that was of any relevance was… Christmas Vacation, that’s quite impressive.  Most everyone has a Eddie in the family, albeit a good bit more racist. Most everyone has heavily medicated grandparents that just stare at the tele and have the age-old conversation of how “the good ole days are gone”. And most everyone has strung out parents just trying to hold everything barely together.

  • Batman Returns (1992)

batmanbatman1I mean… Keaton as Bats. Pfieffer as (the quintessential) Catwoman. DeVito as Penguin. Gloomy neo-gothic Gotham. Can’t go wrong. I’d even go ahead and throw in the original Batman film as a warm up to Returns as well. It also has a winter drabness and why not have a mini-marathon of the Tim Burton masterpieces? It’s also a nice reminder of simpler times, pre-Marvel and Zach Snyder CGI projectile spewing.

Yeah, the holidays can be hell sometimes. The haze of Christmas lights and seasonal scents and corporate greed sends some into a sedated existence. And then there are the Christmas social media defenders. You know, the ones who get really worked up and hateful when underprivileged people point out inequality in America. The type you mostly wonder why you added them to your Facebook in the first place.  The ones who like to share a “IT’S MERRY CHRISTMAS, NOT HAPPY HOLIDAYS” photo everyday. Screw those grinches. Anyways, this time of year can get pretty heavy for a lot of people. So spike that egg nog just a bit more, kick back with these films, and drift away from Grandpa Ulysses’ snoring.

What Comics I’ve Been Reading- April, Part Two

Posted in Comics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 22/04/2014 by Kevin Entrekin

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Continued…

comtomb-Tomb Raider #1. Series. Dark Horse Comics. Script by Gail Simone. Art by Nicolas Daniel Selma. No rating- personally suggest teen. $3.50.

I didn’t do much gaming last year. Or this year either. But one of the titles I was not going to miss was the Tomb Raider reboot. Short version of a review: One of my childhood mainstays got an amazing upgrade.

So I’m a bit disappointed when it comes to this first issue from Dark Horse. In some ways it’s a nice fan service to pick up shortly after where the game left off. But really it is just kind of boring and pretty much a standard first issue. But with most first issues, you want the reader to pick up the next issue. With this, I really didn’t.

The one real positive I take away from this is the art. I’ve never seen any of Nicolas Daniel Selma’s work before this, but I enjoyed it here. The colors are nice and vibrant as well.

comicjup-Jupiter’s Legacy #4. Series. Image Comics. Written by Mark Miller. Art by Frank Quitely. Rated M/ Mature. $2.99.

I wouldn’t say I’m a fan of Mark Millar works, but I have really been enjoying his series Jupiter’s Legacy. It’s an alternate origins of supers and how we and they interact. Millar has wasted no time getting down to the nitty gritty in the first three chapters either.

This fourth chapter takes place several years after the game-changing events that take place in the third, in non-spoiler terms. This is probably the weakest chapter so far from Millar. Which is disappointing since Millar has taken a very lazy approach to releasing this title. Sometimes it is bi-monthly. Sometimes… whenever.

But for $2.99 for Frank Quitely’s beautiful and detailed art is a bargain, especially if you are into this series. If not, I’d encourage finding some copies, as I still find this one of the most interesting series out at the moment. Plus, who knows when the next one comes out?

comstarlight-Starlight #1. Series. Image Comics. Written by Mark Millar. Art by Goran Parlov. Rated M/ Mature. $2.99.

Maybe this somewhat newish series from Millar can explain a bit why it takes him forever to publish Jupiter’s Galaxy. Starlight is what Millar touts as the beginning of his “expanded Millarworld universe”.

Starlight is the tale of Duke Mcqueen, who forty years ago via wormhole became the saviour of the universe. Fast-forward to the present and Duke is a recent widower with some life questions. But it looks like the universe needs saving again and Duke is the man for the job.

There is not much originality here. Millar crafts a story that has been done before. A washed-up old man with a flaky and uncaring family. It’s like The Incredibles  and Gran Torino had a child. But somehow Millar makes you ignore all that and makes an intriguing, albeit short, first issue. I am mostly unfamiliar with Goran Parlov’s work but really enjoyed it. He has a mobius-esque landscapes with lovely pastel-tinted colors.

Ya’ got my attention again, Mark.

comsurf-Silver Surfer #1. Series. Marvel Comics. Written by Dan Slott. Art by Mike & Laura Allred. Rated T+ (teen). $3.99.

I will go anywhere Mike Allred takes me. If that means hitchin’ a ride with Silver Surfer, so be it.

I’m a bit rusty on the SS back story, but I knew enough to understand where this first issue picks up. Basically, Surfer was once Norrin Radd who turned into the Surfer when he begins helping Galactus consume planets. When he comes to Earth, The Fantastic Four helps him find his humanity and turns against Galactus.

Knowing that short bio is beneficial when picking this up, as it takes place sometime after. It’s a pretty standard first issue, but what really makes it worth picking up is the Allreds art. The colors and energy of the art takes some of the sting out of the four-dollar price tag. Worth picking up #2 (which comes out tomorrow) just to see where this goes.

And that’s about it for now. I also picked up Image’s first issue of Deadly Class, which came out in January. Wasn’t anything interesting really. A lot of borrowed, unoriginal ideas pasted together in one book. See you again in May, especially on Free Comic Book Day, May third. Keep reading, ya ginchy people.

 

 

What Comics I’ve Been Reading- April, Part One

Posted in Comics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 18/04/2014 by Kevin Entrekin

BlhyA5zIQAEJUj9.jpg largeI don’t get down to the comic shop as much as I’d like. Mainly because the closest one is in Memphis. Which, in terms of math, is distance plus funds plus mags costing on average about $3 to $5 equals rare visits. I mainly keep up with the goings on in trade paperbacks and similar. But when I do decide to take the advice of Tom and Donna to treat myself, I’ve always gone to Comics & Collectibles on Popular Ave. I’ve never really had a reason to go anywhere else. It has a nice atmosphere, great staff, and all the comics and trades you could want.

Recently my friend Cody and I visited C&C and this is some of new(ish) stuff I picked up:

comroyals-The Royals: Masters of War #1 and #2. Six part series. Vertigo comics. Written by Rob Williams. Art by Simon Coleby. Suggested for Mature Readers. $2.99.

It is the Royal family as you have never seen them before. Throughout history, the royal families of the world have consisted of individuals with super powers. The more pure the bloodline, the stronger the powers. Which might explain that whole inbreeding bit. But during WW2 the royals agree to not use their powers… until British Prince Henry can no longer take sitting by and intervenes. While the morale of Britain is at its highest, the young Prince has broken the treaty and all the countries of the world take notice.

This story is quite an ingenious idea, one that I am surprised no one has thought of before. Ever since Tarantino’s Inglourious Bastards, the idea of alternative history has never been quite the same. This work by Rob Williams is probably the first truly fun story to come out since the above mentioned film in any medium. Simon Coleby’s artwork is beautifully dark and has a sepia-tinge noir feel, which adds a necessary depth here. Having read the first two parts, I’m now really intrigued to see where William will take this story. Part three is now available in local comic shops as well, and this series is well worth looking into.

comempowEmpowered: Internal Medicine. Special one shot issue. Dark Horse Comics. Story by Adam Warren. Art by Brandon Graham (color) and Adam Warren (B&W). No rating- personally suggest older audience. $3.99.

Before this mag, I have never read any of the Empowered comics. I picked this up because of Brandon Graham. I have just recently become infatuated with Mr. Graham’s Gonzo graffiti-style of art and storytelling. He is one of my favorite artist working right now.

The great thing about this one-shot is you don’t really need to know anything about Empowered to enjoy the story. You get a pretty good idea about the character’s modus operandi and even get a crib sheet recap on the first page.

The mass of the story is by Graham, whose colors and art and puns are beautifully presented here. Graham is a brilliant pick for this female lead, as I believe few (male) artist represent strong women quite like him. He can pencil a voluptuous women in real-world dimensions and can make things sexy without making it demeaning to the character, which for some reason seems to be a difficulty for many. Mr. Warren’s manga-esque work here is in beautiful black and white. Together, these two make a fun and entertaining one-shot worthy of the $3.99 price tag.

I think what I come away with after reading this comic most of all is:

  1. I’m very interested in going back and looking at the Empowered trades now.
  2. I’d like to see Graham and Warren work together again.

comdoop– All-New Doop #1. Series. Marvel Comics. Written by Peter Milligan. Art by David Lafuente. Rated T+ (Personally, younger audience would be fine). $3.99.

I picked up this comic because of the Mike Allred (another favorite artist) cover. So I was a bit disappointed when I learned he actually only did the cover for this character he created years ago. The bright side though is that Allred’s wife Laura does the coloring here, which are some of the best you’ll find in a comic. Ultimately though, this first issue falls a bit flat. While it’s a standard first issue in many ways, the direction of where this story is going seems a bit aimless. It has its moments of zany fun and enjoyment, but I think it’s missing that one certain thing that really makes it interesting.

I plan on picking up the second issue when it comes out, but the little green X-Man really has to impress for me to keep picking up any further.

saga3-Saga, Volume 3. TPB collection of series #13-18. Image Comics. Written by Brian K. Vaughan. Art by Fiona Staples. Rated M/Mature. $14.99.

Image Comics is my favorite comic publisher at the moment. They have amazing creator-owned mini-series like Brian Woods Mara and Grant Morrison’s Happy!. They also have ongoing series like Sex Criminals and Great Pacific. Or have you ever heard of The Walking Dead? Yeah, they do that too.

But I think the best representation of what Image has to offer is the vaughn/Staples work Saga. For those unfamiliar with the series, it’s rather simple. Marko is from Wreath. Alana is from Landfall. These two places have been at war with each other forever, but that doesn’t stop Marko and Alana from falling in love with each other. Eventually the two have a child, and both governments of each planet have no interest of letting the birth known to their citizens. The couple have to fight their way planet to planet against the like of bounty hunters and military officers. And worse of all, Marko’s parents.

Of all the now three collected story arcs in the series, I would say this is the weakest. Not to say that it isn’t great. The writing is still top-notch, adult, and witty. Vaughn’s art is still sharp and beautiful. And there is plenty of action and surprises to keep you entertained. But still this just doesn’t have the same bite or vigor. Only slightly though. Still worth picking up.

Part two should be on the way soon…